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Posts for tag: bad breath

By Mark Lukin
May 02, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: bad breath  
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutBadBreath

Q: I often seem to have noticeably bad breath — not just in the morning. How unusual is this problem?
A: Persistent bad breath, or halitosis, is a very common complaint that is thought to affect millions of people, including perhaps 25 to 50 percent of middle aged and older adults. It’s the driving force behind the market for breath mints and mouth rinses, with an estimated value of $3 billion annually. It’s also the third most frequent reason people give for seeing the dentist (after tooth decay and gum disease). So if you have bad breath, you’re hardly alone.

Q: Can bad breath come from somewhere other than the mouth?
A: Most of the time, bad breath does originate in the mouth; its characteristic smell is often caused by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), which have a foul odor. However, it can also come from the nose, possibly as a result of a sinus infection or a foreign body. In some cases, pus from the tonsils can cause halitosis. There are also a few diseases which sometimes give your breath an unpleasant odor.

Q: What exactly causes the mouth to smell bad?
A: In a word: bacteria. Millions of these microorganisms (some of which are harmful, and some helpful) coat the lining of the mouth and the tongue. They thrive on tiny food particles, remnants of dead skin cells, and other material. When they aren't kept under control with good oral hygiene — or when they begin multiplying in inaccessible areas, like the back of the tongue or under the gums — they may start releasing the smells of decaying matter.

Other issues can also contribute to a malodorous mouth. These include personal habits (such as tobacco and alcohol use), consumption of strong-smelling foods (onions and cheese, for example), and medical conditions, like persistent dry mouth (xerostomia).

Q: What can I do about my bad breath?
A: Those breath mints are really just a cover-up. Your best bet is to come in to the dental office for an examination. We have several ways of finding out exactly what’s causing your bad breath, and then treating it. Depending on what’s best for your individual situation, we may offer oral hygiene instruction, a professional cleaning, or treatment for gum disease or tooth decay. Bad breath can be an embarrassing problem — but we can help you breathe easier.

FindingtheRootCauseofBadBreathistheKeytoSuccessfulTreatment

Halitosis (bad breath) is a major personal and social concern — so much so that Americans spend nearly $3 billion annually on rinses, mints and gum to freshen breath. While helpful in alleviating occasional bad breath caused by oral dryness (brought on by stress, eating certain foods, prescription medications, smoking or consuming alcohol), those with chronic halitosis require a much different treatment approach.

That's because there are a number of possible causes for chronic halitosis, among them: xerostomia (chronic dry mouth), caused by mouth breathing; periodontal (gum) disease; or candidiasis, a yeast infection caused by some antibiotics. It may also arise as a secondary symptom of systemic diseases like liver disease, diabetes or cancer.

The most common cause, though, is bacteria. Many types of oral bacteria can produce terrible odors, most notably volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) with their “rotten egg” smell. Because of its relative dryness and difficulty in cleaning, the back of the tongue is a wonderful environment for bacteria to multiply and thrive.

If you suffer from chronic halitosis, our primary objective then is to try to uncover its specific cause, which will determine what course of treatment we would recommend. First, what is your experience with halitosis — have others noticed it or just you? Next, we would consider your medical history — have you had any health issues with your ears, nose or throat, or experienced any gastrointestinal disorders or lung problems? What kind of medications do you take, and are your kidneys and liver functioning properly? We would also perform a thorough dental exam for any signs of tooth decay, gum disease or a dry, coated tongue as well as look at your diet and lifestyle choices, like smoking or alcohol use.

Having a better idea of what may be causing your bad breath, we can then tailor a treatment plan that might involve, among other things, treatment for tooth decay, a periodontal cleaning (scaling), instruction on better oral hygiene and tongue cleaning with a scraper or brush, or the removal of third molars where debris may be accumulating in the gum flaps.

Finding the cause of bad breath can take time, but is well worth the effort. The end result is a treatment plan that works.

If you would like more information on understanding and treating chronic halitosis, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More than just embarrassing.”

TestingYourKnowledgeWhatDoYouKnowAboutBadBreath

Bad breath, medically known as halitosis (“halitus” – breath; “osis” – disorder) is an unpleasant condition that can negatively impact your personal and business relationships. It's more than just embarrassing! In fact, one recent survey found that three out of five people would rather work with someone who talks too loudly than with someone who has bad breath! Gum, mints and mouth rinses can temporarily remedy the situation, but not cure it permanently. So how much do you know about the underlying causes of bad breath?

The following true/false quiz will help you discover, while learning more about bad breath.

Questions

  1. The most common orally related sites associated with bad breath are the tongue and gums.
  2. Systemic (general body) medical conditions can't cause bad breath.
  3. Bad breath is always worse in the morning.
  4. Effective treatment depends on the underlying cause of the disease.
  5. Dentists can do very little to diagnose the cause of bad breath.

Answers

  1. True. The back of the tongue and diseased gums can become repositories for bacteria. In the case of the tongue they are from left over food deposits and even post-nasal drip. Bad breath that emanates from the tongue has a “rotten egg” odor caused by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs).
  2. False. Medical conditions can cause bad breath including lung infections, liver disease, diabetes, kidney infections and cancer.
  3. True. Saliva flow decreases during the night making the mouth feel dry, and giving you that typical “morning breath” taste and odor upon wakening.
  4. True. As with any medical condition, uncovering the origin will dictate appropriate treatment. For example, tongue scraping or brushing can help eliminate odor that originate from the tongue. If the cause is disease related, the disease will need to be treated to control associated bad breath.
  5. False. There are several things dentists can do starting with a thorough medical history and oral examination. For example, decayed or abscessed teeth, diseased gums, coated tongue or infected tonsils are all common oral causes. We can also conduct breath tests to determine if the odor is emanating from the mouth or lungs, and test to determine the level of VSCs in the mouth.

Learn More

Worried about bad breath? Are you ready to trade your breath mints for a more permanent solution? Call our office today to schedule an oral examination. For more information about the causes of bad breath, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing.”

By Stephen P. Lukin, D.D.S.
August 30, 2012
Category: Oral Health
LittleKnownFactsAboutBadBreath

More than 2,000 years ago, an ancient Greek physician, Hippocrates, often called the father of Western medicine, devised a mouth rinse of herbs and wine to sweeten bad breath. This problem has been around a long time, and it is still a major problem for many people. According to some studies it is one of the three main reasons people seek dental treatment.

Here are some facts you may not know about bad breath:

  • Bad breath is sometimes called halitosis, which comes from the Latin halitus (exhalation) and the Greek osis (a condition or disease-causing process).
  • Chronic bad breath is usually caused by certain types of oral bacteria. These particular bacteria are present in about 25% of the population.
  • Bad breath has spawned a major industry in the United States. Americans spend nearly three billion dollars a year on gum, mints, and mouth rinses to sweeten their breath. About 60% of women and 50% of men say they use breath freshening products.
  • Diseases in the oral cavity such as tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease can often cause bad breath. If either of these diseases are your cause for bad breath, treatment would be necessary to eliminate this problem.
  • The tongue is the most common location for bad breath. Bacteria are relatively sheltered on the back of the tongue, where they live on remnants of food, dead skin cells and post-nasal drip. These bacteria can generate volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) that are also found in decaying animal or vegetable matter. VSCs are known by an unpleasant rotten egg smell.
  • Bad breath can also be caused by dry mouth (xerostomia). This condition affects millions of people and can result from smoking, alcohol or coffee drinking, and it is sometimes a side effect of medications. Another cause may be mouth breathing.
  • Halitosis can also originate in other parts of the mouth besides the tongue. These include inter-dental (between teeth) and sub-gingival (under the gums) areas.
  • When people are starving (and sometimes when they are dieting to lose weight), their bodies begin burning their fats causing their breath to develop the smell of ketones — which smell like acetone, similar to nail polish remover. If people are not eating or drinking the coating on their tongue increases as well, making VSCs more prominent.

At our office, we want to fight bad breath or halitosis by making sure our patients understand how to clean their teeth, gums, the back of the tongue, and dentures.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about bad breath. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More than just embarrassing.”

By Stephen P. Lukin, D.D.S.
March 01, 2012
Category: Oral Health
YourCureforBadBreath

Having someone tell you that you have bad breath can be humiliating, but it can also be a sign that you need to see your dentist. Bad breath (or halitosis) can be a sign of an underlying dental or health problem, so before you run out and stock up on breath mints, make an appointment with our office. Using breath fresheners will only disguise the problem and not treat the root cause.

It's important to remember that if you have bad breath, you're not alone — it's the third most common reason people seek a dental consult. We use a systematic approach to determine the cause of your halitosis and offer a solution.

Causes: Ninety percent of mouth odors come from mouth itself — either from the food you eat or bacteria that may be present. Most unpleasant odors originate from proteins trapped in the mouth that are processed by oral bacteria. When left on the tongue, these bacteria can cause an unpleasant smell. Dry mouth, sinus problems, diet and poor oral hygiene can also cause bad breath. In rare cases, a medical condition may be the cause.

Treatment: The best solution will depend on determining the real cause of your halitosis. If bad breath emanates from the mouth, it most commonly is caused by gum disease or even tooth decay, which need to be treated to correct the problem. If halitosis is of systemic (general body) origin, a more detailed examination might be needed from a physician. But the solution may also be as simple as demonstrating how to effectively remove bacterial plaque from your teeth, or offer instruction on proper tongue cleaning. If the cause is gum disease, we may suggest a deep cleaning and possible antibiotic therapy.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss any questions you may have regarding bad breath. Read more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing.”