My Blog

Posts for: August, 2018

By The Benefits of Crowns and Bridges
August 23, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns   Crowns and Bridges  

dental crowns and bridgesImproving the appearance or function of your smile is as easy as adding a crown or bridge. Crowns and bridges are among the restorations that Sugar Land, TX, dentists Dr. Stephen Lukin, Dr. Mark Lukin, and Dr. Leila Asnaashari offer at Lukin Family Dentistry.

What are crowns and bridges?

Crowns are ceramic, resin, porcelain, or porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations that slip over teeth. The hollow restorations are often used to hide imperfections, repair damage or strengthen weak teeth. Crowns are also used to make bridges. Bridges replace missing teeth and are constructed of one or more artificial teeth attached to crowns on either end. The crown portions of the bridge anchor the restoration securely, preventing it from moving when you chew. Crowns are also attached to dental implants, the newest tooth restoration option. Implants bond to the jawbone and serve as synthetic roots.

What advantages do crowns and bridges offer?

Crowns and bridges offer these benefits:

  • Improved Chewing: Damage to a tooth or the loss of one or more teeth can make it hard to chew easily. When it's hard to bite or chew vegetables, fruits, or meat, you may avoid these healthy foods, which may eventually lead to nutritional deficiencies. A crown, bridge, or dental implant makes chewing easier and just may keep you healthier.
  • Stronger Teeth: Crowns are often used to protect and stabilize fragile teeth that have become weaker due to aging, cracks, root canal therapy, trauma, or large fillings.
  • No More Pain: Broken teeth can be very painful. Adding a crown protects the tooth and eliminates pain and sensitivity.
  • Improved Appearance: Many people don't realize just how much they take their smiles for granted until they experience a problem with their teeth. Even a minor defect can make you feel more than a little self-conscious. Crowns and bridges restore your appearance and help you feel better about your smile. Your Sugar Land dentist may recommend a crown if you have a discolored tooth or want to change the shape or length of a tooth. Bridges and crowns connected to dental implants fill the gaps in your teeth, transforming your smile.

Are you ready to take advantage of the smile-enhancing benefits of crowns and bridges? Call Sugar Land, TX, dentists Dr. Stephen Lukin, Dr. Mark Lukin, and Dr. Leila Asnaashari at (281) 265-9000 to schedule an appointment.


By Mark Lukin
August 22, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
ProsandConsforFlossingBeforeBrushingandVice-Versa

For best results in cleaning your teeth of disease-causing plaque you need both the power of brushing open teeth surfaces and flossing in between them. But you may be wondering: should you perform one task before the other?

In general terms, no—there’s no solid evidence that flossing is better before brushing, or vice-versa. But that being said we do recognize each way has its own advantages.

If you floss before brushing, it’s possible you could loosen plaque that can then be easily brushed away when you perform your second hygiene task. Flossing first can also reveal areas that need a bit more attention from brushing if you suddenly encounter heavy particle debris or you notice a little bit of blood on the floss. And, by flossing first you may be able to clear away plaque from your tooth enamel so that it can more readily absorb the fluoride in toothpaste.

One last thing about flossing first: if it’s your least favorite task of the two and you’re of the “Do the Unpleasant Thing First” philosophy, you may want to perform it before brushing. You’re less likely to skip it if you’ve already brushed.

On the other hand, flossing first could get you into the middle of a lot sticky plaque that can gum up your floss. Brushing first removes a good portion of plaque, which can then make flossing a little easier. With the bulk of the plaque gone by the time you floss, you’ll not only avoid a sticky mess on your floss you’ll also have less chance of simply moving the plaque around with the floss if there’s a large mass of it present.

It really comes down to which way you prefer. So, brush first, floss last or vice-versa—but do perform both tasks. The one-two punch of these important hygiene habits will greatly increase your chances for maintaining a healthy mouth.

If you would like more information on effective oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


WhatHappensinaRootCanalTreatmentandHowitCanSaveYourTooth

Along with periodontal (gum) disease, tooth decay poses one of the two greatest threats to your teeth. Cavities are just the start: if decay invades the pulp, the tooth’s innermost layer, the infection created can continue to advance through the root canals to the supporting bone. This worst case scenario could cost you your tooth.

But we can stop this advanced decay in its tracks with a procedure called a root canal treatment. A root canal essentially removes all the infected tissue within the tooth and then seals it from further infection. And contrary to its undeserved reputation for being painful, a root canal can actually stop the severe tooth pain that decay can cause.

At the beginning of the procedure, we deaden the affected tooth and surrounding tissues with local anesthesia—you’ll be awake and alert, but without pain. We then isolate the tooth with a dental dam of thin rubber or vinyl to create a sterile environment around it to minimize contamination from bacteria found in saliva and the rest of the mouth.

We then drill a small hole through the enamel and dentin to access the interior of the tooth. With special instruments, we remove and clean out all the diseased or dead tissue in the pulp chamber and root canals. After disinfecting the empty spaces with an antibacterial solution, we’ll shape the root canals to make it easier to perform the next step of placing the filling.

To fill all the root canals and pulp chamber, we typically use a rubber-like material called gutta-percha. Because it’s thermoplastic (“thermo”—heat; “plastic”—to shape), we can compress it into and against the walls of the root canals in a heated state to fully seal them. This is crucial for preventing the empty tooth interior from becoming re-infected. Afterward, we’ll seal the access hole with its own filling; later, we’ll bond a permanent crown to the tooth for additional protection and cosmetic enhancement.

After the procedure you may have some temporary minor discomfort usually manageable with aspirin or ibuprofen, but your nagging toothache will be gone. More importantly, your tooth will have a second chance—and your dental health and smile will be the better for it.

If you would like more information on treating tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Step-By-Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment.”


KeeponCourseduringthe3PhasesofaSmileMakeover

Are you ready for a new smile? You’ve endured the embarrassment and drain on your of self-confidence long enough. The good news is that modern cosmetic dentistry has an awesome array of materials and methods ready and able to help you make that transformation.

But before you proceed with your “smile makeover” it’s good to remember one thing: it’s a process. And depending on how in-depth your makeover might be, it could be a long one.

To help you navigate, here’s an overview of the three main phases of your smile makeover journey. Each one will be crucial to a successful outcome.

The “Dream” Phase. The path to your new smile actually begins with you and a couple questions: what don’t you like now about your smile? And if you could change anything, what would it be? Right from the start you’ll need to get in touch with your individual hopes and expectations for a better look. With your dentist’s help, take the time during this first phase to “dream” about what’s possible—it’s the first step toward achieving it.

The Planning Phase. With that said, though, your dreams must eventually meet the “facts on the ground” to become a reality. In this phase your dentist works with you to develop a focused, reasonable and doable plan. To do this, they’ll need to be frankly honest with you about your mouth’s health state, which might dictate what procedures are actually practical or possible. You’ll also have to weigh potential treatment costs against your financial ability. These and other factors may require you to modify your expectations to finalize your treatment plan.

The Procedure Phase. Once you’ve “planned the work,” it’s time to “work the plan.” It could be a single procedure like whitening, bonding or obtaining a veneer. But it might also involve multiple procedures and other specialties like orthodontics. Whatever your plan calls for, you’ll need to be prepared for possibly many months or even years of treatment.

Undergoing a smile makeover can take time and money, and often requires a lot of determination and patience. But if you’ve dreamed big and planned well, the outcome can be well worth it.

If you would like more information on ways to transform your smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Beautiful Smiles by Design.”