My Blog

Posts for: June, 2018

By Mark Lukin
June 23, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum recession  
DontWait-SeekOutTreatmentforGumRecessionNow

If you've suddenly noticed your smile looking more “toothy,” you may have a problem with your gums. They may have lost their normal attachment to your tooth and begun to shrink back — or recede.

Millions of people have some form of gum recession. The most common cause is periodontal (gum) disease, but it's not the only one. You may be more susceptible to gum recession because of heredity — you have thin gum tissues passed down to you from your parents. You may also be brushing too hard and too often and have damaged your gums.

Healthy gums play an important role in dental health. The crown, the tooth's visible part, is covered with a hard, protective shell called enamel. As the enamel ends near where the root begins, the gums take over, forming a tight band around the tooth to protect the roots from bacteria and acid.

Receding gums expose these areas of the tooth meant to be covered. This can lead to another tell-tale sign — tooth sensitivity. You begin to notice pain and discomfort while you consume hot or cold foods. And because it leaves your teeth and gums looking much less attractive, it can affect your confidence to smile.

Fortunately, though, we can help restore receded gums. If you have gum disease, it's imperative we treat it as early as possible. We do this by removing plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles that triggers the infection. We use special techniques and hand instruments to remove plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) from all tooth surfaces including along the roots.

Gum disease treatment can help stop and even reverse gum recession. In some cases, though, the recession may have advanced too far. If so, we may need to consider surgically grafting donor tissue to the recessed areas. Depending on the site and extent of recession, this can be a very involved procedure requiring microscopic techniques.

The best approach, though, is to take care of your gums now. Daily brushing and flossing removes harmful plaque; regular dental visits take cleaning a step further and also give us an opportunity to detect disease early. By looking out for your gums now you might be able to avoid gum recession in the future.

If you would like more information on diagnosing and treating gum recession, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


DontFeartheRootCanal-itCouldSaveYourTooth

Many people consider a root canal treatment to be potentially an unpleasant experience. You might even feel a few butterflies fluttering in your stomach if we were to recommend one for you.

But there’s nothing actually to dread about this common and very effective treatment. The procedure doesn’t cause pain; in fact, it most likely relieves tooth pain. What’s more, it could save a tooth that would be otherwise lost.

The name comes from narrow passageways extending from the tip of the root to the innermost tooth pulp. The pulp contains nerves and other structures once vital to early tooth development. And although they’re not as important in a fully mature tooth, those nerves still function. In other words, they can still feel stimulation or pain.

That shouldn’t be a problem with a healthy tooth. But if tooth decay invades the inner pulp, those nerves now under attack will begin firing. You’ll know something’s wrong. As bad as it feels, though, the toothache isn’t your worst problem: if the decay isn’t stopped, it can spread through the root canals to the bone that could eventually lead to losing the tooth.

A root canal treatment removes the decayed pulp tissue and protects the tooth from re-infection. We first deaden the tooth and surrounding tissues with a local anesthesia and set up a rubber dam around the tooth to protect it from contamination from the surrounding environment. We then drill a small access hole through the enamel and dentin to reach the pulp chamber and root canals.

Using special instruments, we remove all the diseased tissue from the pulp and flush out the empty chamber and root canals with antibacterial solutions. After re-shaping the root canals, we fill them and the pulp chamber with gutta-percha, a rubber-like biocompatible material that conforms well to the root canal walls. We seal the gutta-percha with adhesive cement and then fill the access hole. Later, we’ll give the tooth further protection with a custom crown.

After the procedure, you may experience short-term minor discomfort usually manageable with over-the-counter pain relievers like ibuprofen. The good news, though, is that the excruciating nerve pain from within the tooth will be gone—and your tooth will have a new lease on life.

If you would like more information on saving a problem tooth with root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment: What You Need to Know.”


By MARK LUKIN
June 08, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  

Cosmetic DentistryThanks to cosmetic dentistry services and treatments, improving your smile is easier than ever. Sugar Land, TX, dentists Drs. Stephen, Dr. Mark Lukin and Dr. Leila Asnaashari provide a variety of treatments designed to enhance your smile, including veneers, teeth whitening, dental implants and crowns.

Crowns and veneers conceal damage and imperfections

Before you choose a treatment, you'll need to consider costs, treatment details and how long the effects of treatment will last. In some cases, more than one treatment may help you achieve your desired results. For example, oddly shaped teeth can be concealed with both crowns or veneers.

Crowns are hollow restorations that fit over teeth, while veneers are thin porcelain shells that only cover the fronts of teeth. Both restorations can change the shape or length of teeth and conceal cracks and discolorations. Before you receive a crown, your tooth must be prepared to ensure a proper fit for your restoration. In contrast, veneers don't require any change to the size of a tooth. Your tooth is prepared for a veneer by removing a small amount of tooth enamel.

Crowns are also used to strengthen and protect weak and damaged teeth, while veneers offer a long-term whitening option and cover chips, cracks and other surface imperfections. The average lifespan for both crowns and veneers is about 10 to 15 years. The length of time your restoration lasts will depend on the extent of wear and tear.

Teeth whitening brightens your smile in an hour

There's no need to spend weeks applying gels or other whitening products to your teeth when professional whitening offers impressive results in about 60 minutes. Professional whitening agents offered by Sugar Land dentists are stronger than the ones you'll find in drugstore products, enabling them to produce results quickly. After whitening, your teeth may stay whiter for as long as five years.

Dental implants fill gaps in your smile

Rebuilding a lost tooth starts with adding titanium dental implants to your jawbone during minor oral surgery. After a few months, the implant bonds to your jawbone and is ready to serve as a synthetic root for a dental crown. Dental crowns are attached to the top of implants with small screw-like attachments. They not only close the gaps in your smile, but also allow you to eat your favorite foods without worries about slipping or irritation. Dental implants are a long-term restoration option and never need to be replaced in many cases.

Give your smile a boost with cosmetic surgery treatments and services. Call Lukin Family Dentistry in Sugar Land, TX at (281) 265-9000 to schedule an appointment.


GumDiseaseisStillaThreattoYourDentalImplants

You’ve invested quite a bit in your new dental implants. And it truly is an investment: because of implants’ potential longevity, their long-term costs could actually be lower than other restorations whose upfront costs might be less.

But to better ensure their longevity, you’ll need to keep your implants and the natural tissues supporting them clean of bacterial plaque, a sticky biofilm that can cause periodontal (gum) disease. Although the implant itself is unaffected by disease, the natural tissues around it can be.  An infection could ultimately weaken the bone supporting the implant and lead to its failure.

Such an infection involving implants could advance rapidly because they don’t have the natural defenses of the original teeth. Our natural teeth are connected to the jaw through the periodontal ligament, a collagen network that attaches to both the teeth and the bone through tiny tissue fibers. This connection also provides access to antibodies produced by the body to fight infection.

By contrast, we place implants directly into the jawbone. While this creates a very secure attachment, the implant won’t have the same connection as teeth with the body’s immune system. That means any infection that develops in surrounding tissues can spread much more rapidly—and so must be dealt with promptly.

Treating this particular form of gum disease (known as peri-implantitis) is similar to infections with natural teeth and gums, with one important difference involving the tools we use to remove plaque from them. While natural teeth can handle metal scalers and curettes, these can create microscopic scratches in the porcelain and metal surfaces of an implant and create havens for further bacterial growth. Instead, we use instruments made of plastic or resin that won’t scratch, as well as ultrasonic equipment to vibrate plaque loose.

To avoid an infection, it’s important that you brush your implants and surrounding tissues just like you would your natural teeth (be sure you use a soft-bristled brush). And keep up regular dental visits for thorough cleanings and checkups to stay ahead of any developing gum infection. Maintaining your dentures will help ensure they continue to brighten your smile for a long time.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance: Implant Teeth Must be Cleaned Differently.”